Weekend Coffee Share: April 7, 2019

Welcome to the Weekend Coffee Share, hosted by Allison at http://eclecticali.wordpress.com

I had a lot of work this weekend that involved computer time, but I got a little relaxation in, so I’m going to express most of it in photos.

Friday night TV on the recliner at my boyfriend’s house.  Seinfeld rules!

I finished this heart-breaking book, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, Saturday. WW2 Holocaust, #historicalfiction.  It has quite a deep message.

I took the time to get my toes pedicured as well.

Saturday I wore my new dress to church. I have to wear it before Lent is over, besides, the weather here will only get hotter.  Now I’ll retire it until fall.  You can’t beat a black dress, and with polka dots to boot!  Now I have to start wearing pastels to celebrate Spring!

Have a great week, my friends and fellow bloggers!

Books I’m Thankful for, 2018. #books

This was day 3 of “Books I’m Thankful for.” Daily, I’ve been mentioning a book that I am grateful for on social media as we go through this Thanksgiving week. I also encourage you to share yours! This is The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger. If you have ever felt like a social misfit, you just may identify with Holden Caulfield. When I read this, I was 18, newly graduated, and a little cut-off from my high school social tribe. I can’t say I felt like he felt, or did the things he did, but I can tell you, what he was going through, I felt like I’d been through it before, right at about year 16 to 17.

Let me quote: “Among other things, you’ll find that you’re not the first person who was ever confused and frightened and even sickened by human behavior. You’re by no means alone on that score, you’ll be excited and stimulated to know.” When I read a book, sometimes the main character becomes just like a friend, and I am able to shut out the world around me. Some say the character Holden is a sick person. We’ve all been sick at one time or another. Some of us will tell no one. We may only tell parts of it to our friends, but here is a character who will tell you the whole story. I loved that.

Other books I’ve mentioned include: The Help, by Kate Sprockett, Little Women by Loiusa May Alcott, One Day My Soul Just Opened Up by Iyanla Vanzant, and Fish Out of Water, by Helen Palmer will likely be my finisher, as it is the first book my mom can recall ever reading to me, which also makes me very thankful!

 Inspirational reading by Iyanla Vanzant.

 The first book that helped me to love books.

I hope you all have an enjoyable, heart-warming Thanksgiving holiday and plenty of time to read a good book!

Books You May Not Know of, but Ought to Try! A Magical Setting in Ga.

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My next installment of “Books You May Not Know of….but Ought to Try” is Auraria by Tim Westover.

Blurb:

Water spirits, moon maidens, haunted pianos, headless revenants, and an invincible terrapin that lives under the mountains. None of these distract James Holtzclaw from his employer’s mission: to turn the fading gold-rush town of Auraria, GA, into a first-class resort and drown its fortunes below a man-made lake. But when Auraria’s peculiar people and problematic ghosts collide with his own rival ambitions, Holtzclaw must decide what he will save and what will be washed away. Taking its inspiration from a real Georgia ghost town, Auraria is steeped in the folklore of the Southern Appalachians, where the tensions of natural, supernatural and artificial are still alive.

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To be honest, I don’t think this is a self-published novel.  It is very well-done, but I would not have heard of the author if it weren’t for Kindle’s book recommendations.  I truly am thankful for that program, as I love to read wide.  Looking further, I see that it is doing well on the charts, and it has 186 reviews averaging four stars.

This book took me outside of myself.  It is at once historical and fantastical.  You can imagine the main character in this situation 100 years ago, faced with the decision of turning a charming Southern town on its head or leaving them to live in their own idyllic ways.  Only, add magical singing beings, sheepfruit, (what IS that anyway?  I’d like to see it), and ghosts, and you have a joyride of a story based on a true Georgia ghost town.  Don’t expect to understand it all right away.  The author has created an alternate world in this town.  Personally, I’d love to visit!  Read this book for a quick, imaginative get away.